Musings On Silver (November 21, 2016)

. . .

_          “First place among the losers?”

_          “Dismissed as the ‘also-ran’ of precious metals?”

_          “Chump change or chump’s change?”

. . .

_          “I view gold as the farm and silver as the crops and the animals.  You do not sell the farm.  You do buy, sell and exchange the crops and the animals.”  

_          “So gold is the store of value and silver is the medium of exchange.  But what is the unit of account – hectares or hogs . . . or flashy pretentious paper with no real underlying value other than faith that is often misplaced by the populace?”

. . .

_          “The historic price relationship between gold and silver is way out of kilter.  Gold should be priced lower or silver should be priced higher.  If you account for the cost of production, gold is not priced too low and cannot be priced much lower without impacting the supply which will . . . drive up the price and further distort the price and the historic price relationship.  Ergo, silver should be priced much higher.”

_          “Everything is out of kilter.  Like so many other ostensible markets, we are dealing with rigged rackets.  Both prices are held artificially low by the powers that control price and sell paper precious metals.  But the prices cannot be held low forever.”

_          “Mr. Supply and Ms. Demand are not in the game.”

_          “Except to the extent that if a miner cannot make any money from mining, the miner will not mine.”

. . .

_          “Gold is for kings and silver is for royalty.”

. . .

_          “And there are some pure silver mines, yet silver is usually a byproduct of other mining for gold and copper.  The economics are intertwined and interdependent.”

. . .

_          “Someone said that roughly seventy percent of gold is used in jewelry and roughly seventy percent of silver is used in electronics and other commercial uses.”  

_          “Silver was once used in large quantities for analog photography.”

_          “Many digital devices use a speck of silver.  Those specks add up to a peck.”

. . .

_          “She reported back to her students that during her field trip to China fifteen years earlier, some shopkeepers exchanged her pre-1965 Washington silver quarters for two dollars and fifty cents in credit for her purchases in the shop that day.  Think about it, on average, the Chinese shopkeepers offered the tenfold premium without even a prod or a prompting.  They are in the know and they know it.”

_          “The Chinese shop keepers’ take on the pre-1965 two bits is revealing.  They will take them in exchange for twenty bits worth of products.”  

. . .

_          “That Series 1935 A silver certificate framed in the den is from a Hong Kong shopkeeper who swiftly slipped the certificate with the lapis lazuli Treasury seal in among the other unpretentious camo-colored Federal Reserve Notes she dealt and dropped in front of me.  She appeared to be sloughing it off on someone who might not notice the outlier dealt to him.  I pulled it out of the stack, stared at it and could hear its story and feel its history.” 

. . .

_          “And silver is shinier than gold.”

_          “Describing a silver salmon as ‘dime bright’ invokes and evokes a clear image.”

. . .

[See the e-commentary at “The Silver Standard:  The Value Of (Sort Of) Real Money (July 15, 2013)”, “Is The Gold Standard Really The Gold Standard? (January 18, 2010)”, “The Gold Standard Revisited (August 15, 2015)”, “‘Fiat Gold’ / Fool’s Gold (May 2, 2011)”, and “The Mandibles, FRNs, SDRs, IMF, G20, WTD! (September 5, 2016).”]

[JFK – May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963]

Bumper stickers of the week:

Silence is golden; gold is silent

What is the gold standard again?

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