Archive for the Nobel Prize Category

Third Annual Noble Prize In Eco-nomics (October 8, 2018)

Posted in Awards / Incentives, Economics, Economics Nobel, Nobel Prize, Noble Prize, Noble Prize in Eco-nomics on October 8, 2018 by e-commentary.org

. . .

K          “An award dedicated to acknowledging and celebrating the work of someone on the planet who really knows something about eco-nomics.  Eco-nomics is about making and sharing; e-con-omics is about taking and stealing.”

J          “The Noble Prize in Eco-nomics is a delightful and playful replacement for the discredited and misnamed ‘Nobel’ Prize in Voodoo E-con-omics.  And I get it.  You get what you reward.  You need to reward what you want to get.  Who gets it this year?”

K          “The recipient of the third annual Noble Prize In Eco-nomics is . . . Ellen H. Brown who writes and speaks about money and banking and the need for public banks, authored the books Web of Debt and The Public Bank Solution and still develops the “Web of Debt Blog”.  Her considerable corpus of work is undergirded by the conviction that eco-nomics should be concerned with pursuing the public good not just producing goods.”

. . .

J          “The ‘Nobel’ Prize in Voodoo E-con-omics is given by the Swedish Central Bank to someone who advances the interests of the central bankers or at least does not threaten them.  Ellen Brown is number ‘n’ on the central bankers’ list of possible recipients.” 

K          “And Bill Black is number ‘n – 1’ on the central bankers’ list of possible recipients.”  

. . .

K          “The Committee also examined and considered the pioneering work of Professors Mark Skidmore and Laurence  J. Kotlikoff who have contributed immensely and without enough credit to tracking and analyzing federal expenditures that are not on the books or part of the public discussion.”

. . .

[See the “Intergenerational Financial Obligations Reform Act” (INFORM Act), “Has Our Government Spent $21 Trillion Of Our Money Without Telling Us?” in “Forbes” by Laurence Kotlikoff and Mark Skidmore dated December 8, 2017 and “Heretics welcome!  Economics needs a new Reformation” in “The Guardian” by Larry Elliott dated December 17, 2017.]

[See the e-commentary at “Second Annual Noble Prize In Eco-nomics (October 9, 2017)”, “First Annual Noble Prize In Eco-nomics (October 10, 2016)”, “Announcing The First Annual Noble Prize In Eco-nomics (May 2, 2016)”, “Award Deadlines (Livelines?) (July 25, 2016)”, “From e-con-omics to eco-nomics? (August 1, 2011)”, and “Skip the Nobel in Economics (October 6, 2009)”.]

Bumper stickers of the week:

The life cycle of American business:  Engineers build, salespersons sell, hedge funders loot

When what is known as “e-con-omics” transitioned to “behavioral economics,” the undertaking should have been moved from the department of religion to the department of psychology.  The undisciplined discipline does not require its own department.

Boycott banks; support credit unions

Second Annual Noble Prize In Eco-nomics (October 9, 2017)

Posted in Awards / Incentives, Economics, Economics Nobel, Nobel Prize, Noble Prize, Noble Prize in Eco-nomics on October 9, 2017 by e-commentary.org

. . .

K          “An award dedicated to acknowledging and celebrating the work of someone on the planet who really knows something about eco-nomics.  Eco-nomics is about making and sharing; e-con-omics is about taking and stealing.”

J          “The Noble Prize in Eco-nomics is a delightful and playful replacement for the discredited ‘Nobel’ Prize in Voodoo E-con-omics.  And I get it.  You get what you reward.  You need to reward what you want to get.  Who gets it this year?”

K          “The recipient of the second annual Noble Prize In Eco-nomics is . . . Norbert Häring of Planet Earth and Germany.  His considerable corpus of work is undergirded by the conviction that eco-nomics should be concerned with pursuing the public good not just producing goods.”

. . .

[See “There Is No Nobel Prize in Economics” in “AlterNet” by Yasha Levine dated October 12, 2012, “The Nobel family dissociates itself from the economics prize” in “Real-World Economics Review Blog” by Jorge Buzaglo dated October 22, 2010 and “The Beauty (Pageant?) of Economics” in “Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis” by Ronald A. Wirtz dated September 1, 1999.]

[See the e-commentary at “Announcing The First Annual Noble Prize In Eco-nomics (May 2, 2016)”, “Award Deadlines (Livelines?) (July 25, 2016)”, “From e-con-omics to eco-nomics? (August 1, 2011)” and “Skip the Nobel in Economics (October 6, 2009).”]

Bumper stickers of the week:

Eco-nomics is about good; e-con-omics is about goods

Eco-nomics is about making; e-con-omics is about taking

Eco-nomics is about making good; e-con-omics is about taking goods

“There is only one difference between a bad economist and a good one: the bad economist confines himself to the visible effect; the good economist takes into account both the effect that can be seen and those effects that must be foreseen.”  Claude-Frédéric Bastiat

The Driverless Car Of Tomorrow . . . Is Here Today! (December 19, 2016)

Posted in Awards / Incentives, Genius, Global Climate Change, Global Warming, Nobel Prize, Technology, Transportation on December 19, 2016 by e-commentary.org

. . .

K          “At the Complexity Lecture in August, the engineering professor promulgated what he posits are the five technological plateaus to achieve the transition from a car that stops when it perceives another object or person to the transportation platform of the future that permits you to slip on board and sleep while being delivered to your destination.”

J          “Public transportation.”

K          “Exactly.  They do not realize how close they are to the solution.  Yet that is the sixth level of spiritual enlightenment that they cannot perceive because they do not recognize that the fifth plateau is what climbers call a false peak.”

J          “I went to a similar lecture, looked around and noted that I was the only one in the room who was not an engineer.  When done listening to the lecture and the question and answer session, I realized that I may have been the only one in the room who was an engineer.”

. . .

J          “To be nice, do you want me to e-mail Elon and you e-mail Senor Google?”

K          “While you are at it, let them know that Mother Nature has promulgated some immutable restrictions that are challenged but will not be surmounted by humans.  Those who control buckets and barrels of fossil fuel resources – and substantial government largesse – may be able to travel to Mars and take a selfie, but there will never be sustainable human colonies there.”

J          “Not having any vision or imagination is so debilitating.  The way I see it, many humans have an impulse to travel and explore.  Some who are imagining a colony/land fill on Mars do not realize that they are unwittingly manifesting their ‘fight or flight’ response by attempting to abandon and flee the great Superfund Site for another promised land.”

K        “And all in an electric driverless car.”

. . .

J          “As I recall, we retrieve our Nobels in December?”

. . .

[See “Google Wants Driverless Cars, but Do We?” by Jamie Lincoln Kitman.]  

[See the e-commentary at “Amtrak – The (Rail) Road to National Security (January 23, 2006)”.]

Bumper sticker of the week:

Be the first on your block to take the transportation device of the future . . . today

First Annual Noble Prize In Eco-nomics (October 10, 2016)

Posted in Awards / Incentives, Banks and Banking System, Courage, Credit Unions, Crime/Punishment, Economics, Economics Nobel, FDIC, Journalism, Kleptocracy, Law, Newspapers, Nobel Prize, Noble Prize, Noble Prize in Eco-nomics, Press/Media, Rule of Law, Song Reference on October 10, 2016 by e-commentary.org

. . .

K          “An award dedicated to acknowledging and celebrating the work of someone on the planet who really knows something about eco-nomics.”

J          “Novel.  Appropriate.  Necessary.  And unprecedented.”

K          “The recipient of the first annual Noble Prize In Eco-nomics is . . . Professor William Kurt Black, Esq. professor of law and economics with the University of Missouri at Kansas City.  With decades of substantial and substantive real world experience, Professor Black examines and explicates the workings of banks and the banking system in the United States and the world with insight and conviction.  In his classic, timely and timeless magnum opus The Best Way to Rob a Bank is to Own One, he advances the conservative notion that those in the banking industry who commit systematic and rampant fraud should be convicted.  In an inspiring TEDxUMKC presentation available at TED the national public forum, he notes that bankers deploy banks as weapons of mass destruction against the public.  Unlike so many other law professors and judges who explore the interface of law and economics, he contends that law and economics should serve more than the interests of the wealthy and the powerful.  A felicitous contributor to the public discourse and dialogue, Professor Black’s continuing academic and personal commitment to the common weal and greater good is a good thing.”

. . .

[“This is Walter Kingsbury Brinkley, XYZ News, New York.  Earlier today, the highly coveted Noble Prize In Eco-nomics was awarded to Professor William K. Black, Esq. of the University of Missouri at Kansas City.  In his most celebrated work, Professor Black contends among other observations that the adoption of the rule of law in America is a swell idea.  In a related development, the Swedish bankers convened and announced the 2016 Nobel Prize in E-con-omics given to the individual who has or individuals who have done the most during his, her or their career to advance the interests of the wealthy and powerful.  . . . “]

[See the e-commentary at “Announcing The First Annual Noble Prize In Eco-nomics (May 2, 2016)”, “Award Deadlines (Livelines?) (July 25, 2016)”, “From e-con-omics to eco-nomics? (August 1, 2011)” and “Skip the Nobel in Economics (Oct. 6, 2009).”]

Bumper stickers of the week:

“Yes, as through this world I’ve wandered I’ve seen lots of funny men; Some will rob you with a six-gun, and some with a fountain pen.”  “The Ballad of Pretty Boy Floyd” by Woody Guthrie (c) 1958 (renewed) Woody Guthrie Publications, Inc.

Give a man a gun and he can rob a bank; give a man a bank and he can rob the world.

The Gold Standard Revisited  (August 15, 2016)

Posted in Book Reference, Dollar - World's Reserve Currency, Gold, Gold Standard, Money, Nobel Prize, Noble Prize, Petrodollar, SDR - Special Drawing Rights, Silver, Silver Standard on August 15, 2016 by e-commentary.org

. . .

M          “You may be right.”

G          “I don’t want to be right.  But you just cannot trust the government.”

M          “It will never seem reasonable, but it is rational.  We must do something to restrain human nature and government excess.”

. . .

G          “Gold is an element.  Gold is a commodity.  Gold is a currency if folks act as if it is a currency.  Gold is what you make it.  The vote is coming in.  The Swiss not so much but who knows what to make about the election.  Those who vote in favor of the dollar or the pound and against gold as a currency may soon be . . . pounding sand.”

. . .

G          “As I recall, Keynes proclaimed that the gold standard, not gold per se, is a ‘barbarous relic.’  ‘Barbarian’ means ‘foreign.’  For example, ‘Barbara’ is a ‘foreign woman.’  So that might suggest that the gold standard, or at least gold, is popular in foreign countries.  And it is.  One point four billion Chinese and one point three billion Indians relish the element.  The Russians embrace it with both paws.”

M          “Seems that Au is A1 in the world today.”

. . .

M          “Tying human activity to an element such as Au seems so . . . confining.  And elemental.  Yet without something tethering human greed, ‘printing money’ is a temptation too great.  If he had known about it, Bill Shakespeare would have written about it.”

G          “You cannot trust the government.  And yet the great irony is that the government is not printing money.  The government has ceded power to the Federal Reserve which sounds like the government and yet is a private business that owes its allegiance to the banks and advances the welfare of the those in the stock market racket.” 

. . . 

M          “Keynes criticized the gold standard because it was a direct threat to his ego and his identity and his desire to make unbridled decisions.  That is the hallmark of what passed for the elite.”

G          “No one in power wants to be restrained by a standard.  Some standard is better than no standard.”

. . .

G          “The rule of law is a civilizing relic yet not one in currency today.  Even with more rules and laws on the books than ever in the history of humankind, the rule of law simply does not apply to those in power.  The law is no restraint.”

. . .

G          “The Nobel gang rewards those who shill for the fiat system and the central banks.  If the Nobel gang gave awards for those who ask probing questions about the viability and consequences of fiat currency and unrestrained debt, there would be more folks asking probing questions about the viability and consequences of fiat currency and unrestrained debt.”

M          “Perhaps the new Noble Prize in Eco-nomics can be awarded to those few individuals who ask probing questions and provide trenchant answers.”

. . .

[See the previous great gold standard debate in the e-commentary at “Is The Gold Standard Really The Gold Standard? (January 18, 2010)”, a discussion of the silver standard at “The Silver Standard:  The Value Of (Sort Of) Real Money (July 15, 2013)” and the observation in “The U.S. And Saudi Arabia:  Not Playing Well With Others (Each Other) (July 11, 2016)” that President Nixon decided unilaterally to cancel the direct international convertibility of the United States dollar to gold today.]

Bumper stickers of the week:

“In truth, the gold standard is already a barbarous relic.”  John M. Keynes, A Tract on Monetary Reform (1924).

“Real gold is not afraid of the fire of a red furnace.”  Chinese proverb

“There are three hundred economists in the world who are against gold, and they think that gold is a barbarous relic – and they might be right.  Unfortunately, there are three billion inhabitants of the world who believe in gold.”  Attributed to János Fekete

In every country, culture and civilization through space and across time, gold is the one thing and the only thing that has been cherished by everyone everywhere at all times.

Eco-nomic SAT Question:  Which statement does not fit:  1) resources are finite, 2) water is finite, 3) gold is finite or 4) money printing is infinite?

The Gold Standard may just be the Gold Standard or at least a standard.

The G20 Leaders Summit is in Hangzhou, China this September 4 and 5.

Convention between the United States and Great Britain (for Canada) for the Protection of Migratory Birds, also called the Migratory Bird Treaty, was signed on August 16, 1916.

Award Deadlines (Livelines?) (July 25, 2016)

Posted in Awards / Incentives, Cameo In Courage Award, Nobel Prize, Noble Prize, Profile In Courage Award, Pulitzer, Pushitzer on July 25, 2016 by e-commentary.org

. . .

K          “You could sit around and whinge, as the Australians say, or you could stand up and do something about it.  If they are rewarding the wrong person, reward the right person.  Reward talent, raw and varnished, unknown and unacknowledged.”

. . .

Award:                                 App. Liveline:           Announcement:

Pushitzer In Commentary Last Friday in Jan.   Third Monday April

Cameo in Courage              Last Friday in Feb.   Second Monday May

Noble in Eco-nomics          Last Friday in Aug.   Second Monday Oct.

Noble in Jurisprudence      Last Friday in Aug.   Third Monday Oct.

Hammerstein Awards        Under construction

Bybee/Watford/Canby*     Under construction

                  Dishonest Judge Award

. . .

J          “Someone has to do it.”

. . .

[See the e-commentary at “Announcing The First Annual Noble Prize In Eco-nomics (May 2, 2016)”, “First Annual ‘Cameo In Courage’ Award For 2016 (May 9, 2016)”,  “First Annual Pushitzer Prize In Commentary For 2016 (April 18, 2016)” and “On Standards & Quality (July 20, 2015).”]

Bumper stickers of the week:

“You do not merely want to be considered just the best of the best.  You want to be considered the only one who does what you do.”  Jerry Garcia

If you want law and order, try a little justice

Think big, think long.

Announcing The First Annual Noble Prize In Eco-nomics (May 2, 2016)

Posted in Awards / Incentives, Economics, Economics Nobel, Nobel Prize, Noble Prize on May 2, 2016 by e-commentary.org

. . .

          “This year, the first annual Noble Prize in Eco-nomics is to be awarded to the individual or individuals who have made the greatest contribution to the understanding of eco-nomics and the operation of the eco-nomy.  To be announced on the second Monday each October and this year on October 11, the award is established and endowed with a prize purse of $250.  Nominations are accepted through the last Friday each August and this year on August 26.”

. . .

[Send a nomination and a supporting letter to e-ssay@gci.net by August 26, 2017 and send the entry fee to your favorite charity.]

[See the e-commentary at “From e-con-omics to eco-nomics? (August 1, 2011)” and “Skip the Nobel in Economics (October 6, 2009).”]

[See “The Beauty (Pageant?) of Economics.”]

Bumper sticker of the week:

If all economists were laid end to end, they would not reach a conclusion.